Dansk
Entomologisk
Forening





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About DEF

Dansk Entomologisk Forening / the Danish Entomological Society is an umbrella organization for the six Danish entomological societies representing all in all approximately 800 members.

The members are both professional and amateur entomologists and together represent almost the entire expertise within the field of insects and related groups in Denmark.

The objectives of Danish Entomological Society are:
  • To strengthen the conservation of insect-habitats and call attention to threads against species and habitats.
  • To promote integration of entomology and insect habitats in nature conservation and in plans, policies and projects at all levels.
  • To stimulate the general interest for entomology and to secure good opportunities for performing entomological activities.
  • To extend people´s knowledge of entomology and disseminate information on entomological matters and issues to the media.
  • To strengthen Nordic cooperation with sister organisations in the other Nordic and Baltic countries.
As a member of an associated entomological society you participate in the exploration of the Danish insect fauna and in monitoring species and habitats.

Danish Entomological Society is a partner of IUCN´s Countdown 2010 network.

Danish Entomological Society is also a partner of Butterfly Conservation Europe . The objectives of BC Europe is to preserve butterflies and their habitats.




The board:

  • Svend Bagger Larsen
  • Morten S. Mølgaard
  • Carsten Hviid: Secretary
  • Jan F. Rasmussen

Scientific committee

The scientific committee consists of up to 25 specialists covering a broad spectrum of knowledge within different entomologic disciplines as well as public administration.

The scientific committee is concerned with amongst others:
  • Preparation of red lists for insects.
  • Factual contributions to nature conservation projects.
  • Hearings regarding
    • preparation of legislation,
    • nature conservation projects and plans,
    • plans for management of public owned forests,
    • plans for management of military exercise areas etc.
  • Participation in establishing and implementing databases for insects.
  • Monitoring EU-habitat species, protected species and other species of particular interest.
  • Cooperation with other "green" oragnizations.

Protected species in Denmark

The below mentioned species are protected either through specific Danish regulation (SDR), EU habitat directive (EU), The Bern convention (B) or by voluntary regulation instituted by DEF (DEF):

Butterflies and moths:
Parnassius mnemosyne (Linnaeus, 1758):SDR, EU, B (Extinct)
Papilio machaon Linnaeus, 1758:DEF (Migratory)
Leptidea reali (Reissinger, 1989):DEF (Probably extinct)
Lycaena dispar (Haworth, 1802):SDR, EU, B (Extinct)
Maculinea arion (Linnaeus, 1758):SDR, EU, B
Boloria dia (Linnaeus, 1758):DEF
Euphydras aurinia (Rottemburg, 1775):SDR, EU, B
Coenonnympha arcania (Linnaeus, 1761):DEF (Probably extinct)
Coenonnympha hero (Linnaeus, 1761):SDR, EU, B (Extinct)
Proserpinus Proserpina (Pallas, 1772):SDR, EU, B (Migratory)
Chloantha hyperici (Denis & Schiffermüller, 1775):DEF
Beetles:
Osmoderma eremita (Scopoli, 1763):SDR, EU, B
Lucanus cervus (Linnaeus, 1758):SDR, EU, B (Status uncertain)
Limoniscus violaceus (Müller, 1821):SDR, EU (Extinct)
Brachinus crepitans (Linnaeus, 1758):SDR (On one habitat)
Dytiscus latissimus Linnaeus, 1758:SDR, EU, B
Graphoderus bilineatus (De Geer, 1774):SDR, EU, B
Dragonflies:
Aeshna viridis Eversmann, 1836:SDR, EU, B
Ophiogomphus cecilia (Fourcroy, 1785):SDR, EU, B
Leucorrhinia caudalis (Charpentier, 1840):SDR, EU, B (Extinct)
Leucorrhinia albifrons (Burmeister, 1839):SDR, EU, B (Extinct)
Leucorrhinia pectoralis (Charpentier, 1825):SDR, EU, B
Pseudoscorpions:
Anthrenochernes stellae (Lohmander, 1938):EU

Normally the protection means that collection is not allowed. However the DEF voluntary regulations are often not prohibitive but function as limitations on collection.

Some of the species are described in more detail below.


Foto © Tom Nygård Kristensen

Maculinea arion (Linnaeus, 1758):

Legal status: Protected by law, EU habitat directive (Annex IV), The Bern Convention (Annex II).

Redlist category (Denmark): CR (critically endangered).

Occurrence: One locality on the island of Møn (maybe also undiscovered populations in the North-western corner of Jutland).


Foto © Tom Nygård Kristensen

Euphydras aurinia (Rottemburg, 1775):

Legal status: Protected by law, EU habitat directive (Annex II), The Bern Convention (Annex II).

Redlist category (Denmark): CR (critically endangered).

Occurence: Very local in the Northern parts of Jutland.


Foto © Philip Francis Thomsen

Osmoderma eremita (Scopoli, 1763):

Legal status: Protected by law, EU habitat directive (Annex II), The Bern Convention (Annex II).

Redlist categoy (Denmark): EN (endangered).

Occurence: Very local on Sealand, Lolland and Falster.


Foto © Mogens Holmen

Dytiscus latissimus Linnaeus, 1758:

Legal status: Protected by law, EU habitat directive (Annex II & IV), The Bern Convention (Annex II).

Redlist category: In Denmark categorized as E (Critically endangered (Redlist-97)); globally as VU (IUCN 2006 (1996): Vulnerable).

Occurrence: Very local on the island of Bornholm.


Foto © Mogens Holmen

Graphoderus bilineatus (De Geer, 1774):

Legal status: Protected by law, EU habitat directive (Annex II & IV), The Bern Convention (Annex II).

Redlist category: In Denmark categorized as E (Critically endangered (Redlist-97)); globally as VU (IUCN 2006 (1996): Vulnerable).

Occurrence: Very local in the North-eastern parts of Sealand, Bornholm.


Foto © Mogens Holmen

Aeshna viridis Eversmann, 1836:

Legal status: Protected by law, EU habitat directive (Annex II & IV), The Bern Convention (Annex II).

Redlist category: In Denmark categorized as NE (not evaluated) (Redlist 97: V (vulnerable)); in Europe categorized as E (1988) (endangered), Globally as LC (least concern - IUCN, evaluated 2005).

Occurrence: Local in the South-western Jutland, the North-eastern parts of Sealand and Bornholm. The species is seemingly progressing although slowly.


Foto © Mogens Holmen

Ophiogomphus cecilia (Fourcroy, 1785):

Legal status: Protected by law, EU habitat directive (Annex II & IV), The Bern Convention (Annex II).

Redlist category: In Danmark categorized as LC (least concern) (Redlist 97: R (rare)). In Europe as E (endangered) (1988). Globally evaluated as LC (least concern - IUCN, evaluated 1996).

Occurrence: Local in Jutland. It seams as this species has benefited from a better quality of the water environment. The species is thus in progress.


Foto © Mogens Holmen

Leucorrhinia pectoralis (Charpentier, 1825):

Legal status: Protected by law, EU habitat directive (Annex II & IV), The Bern Convention (Annex II).

Redlist category (Denmark): VU (vulnerable).

Occurence: Very local in the North-eastern parts of Sealand, Falster. Maybe also populations in the Eastern parts of Jutland.


Foto © Mogens Holmen

Anthrenochernes stellae (Lohmander, 1938):

Legal status: EU habitat directive (Annex II & IV).

Scorpions are not yet redlisted i Denmark.

Occurrence: Sealand.



Code of conduct

As a member of an associated entomological society the DEF code of conduct regarding protection of species and habitats must be obliged (main paragraphs):
  • Danish legislation and regulation, EU-regulation and international conventions must be strictly obliged.
  • The DEF voluntary regulation on collection of certain species must be obliged.
  • Collection must not be associated with commercialism (no commercial buying and selling of collected material).
  • Collection of local and rare species should be carried out with caution and care. Collection should be completely avoided in years of poor abundance.
  • In collection of local and rare species it is advisable to search for new localities instead of collecting on the well-known localities.
  • Collection of large numbers of specimens of one single species from one locality within a short period of time is considered unethical.
  • In carrying out entomological activities care should be taken towards breeding birds, vegetation and other people's activities.
  • Use of light-traps that automatically kills caught insects can only be used as part of specific projects approved by the Museum of Zoology, Copenhagen on behalf of the Danish Forest and Nature Agency

Contact


Please contact us via EFU

EFU

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Links

Danish entomologic societies:

Entomologisk Forening
Lepidopterologisk Forening
Århus Entomologklub
Entomologisk selskab for fyn
Nordjysk Lepidopterologklub

Nordic / Baltic entomologic societies:

Norsk Entomologisk Forening (Norway)
Sveriges Entomologiska Förening (Sweden)
Lepidopterological Society of Finland (Finland)
Entomological Society Latvia (Latvia)
Entomologiska Föreningen i Stockholm (Sweden)

Miscellaneous:

SEL (Societas Europaeus Lepidopterorum)
Skov og Naturstyrelsen
Museum of Zoology, Copenhagen
Naturhistorisk Museum, Aarhus
Countdown 2010
Butterfly Conservation Europe